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the Degree Confluence Project
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United States : Utah

4.0 miles (6.5 km) SW of Kaysville, Davis, UT, USA
Approx. altitude: 1282 m (4205 ft)
([?] maps: Google MapQuest OpenStreeMap topo aerial ConfluenceNavigator)
Antipode: 41°S 68°E

Accuracy: 2.1 km (1.3 mi)
Quality:

Click on any of the images for the full-sized picture.

#2: Lots of long grass (more than 2 meters tall) #3: My GPS receiver, 1.28 miles from the point #4: My GPS receiver, 1.28 miles from the point

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  41°N 112°W (visit #13) (incomplete) 

#1: An exhausted confluence hunter, abandoning his trek, 1.28 miles from the point

(visited by Ross Finlayson)

26-Jul-2021 -- I was in Salt Lake City - heading back to the San Francisco Bay Area after my mountain biking (and confluence hunting) vacation in Colorado. I kept hearing about record low water levels in the Great Salt Lake, so decided to take advantage of this by attempting to visit this Degree Confluence Point. When Shawn Fleming visited this point, he noted that the lake level was low: 4192 feet above sea level. Today, however, the lake level was even lower: 4,190.90 feet.

I first drove to the end of Angel Street (where Shawn had parked), but the terrain in the distance looked too ‘marshy’ for my taste. So instead, I drove to the end of Roueche Lane, and parked at [41.01484,-111.9658], 2.02 miles from the point. My hike began by crossing a gate and a couple of annoying barbed-wire fences, then a short section of flat, dry land. But then I entered the long grass. Long, dead grass. Long, living grass. Very long (more than 2 meters tall!), dead grass. Very long, living grass. (Should you attempt to visit this point, long trousers and eye protection are essential.) No matter what type of grass I hiked through, there was a deep, springy undergrowth of dead grass that was extremely energy-sapping. Fortunately, though, water was not a problem. The ground was moist in places, but water never came close to covering my boots.

My biggest nemesis, however, was the temperature: In the upper 90s F (upper 30s C). After slogging just 1/2 mile through the long grass, I was exhausted, and had hiked only 1/3 of the way, with 1.28 miles still remaining. I was out of energy, and I had no idea how much long grass remained; I had no choice but to give up.

If I attempt this point again, it will be in September or October, when the temperature will be much lower (and the lake level may also be even lower). I’ll also try to find a trail that avoids much of the long grass (with its deep, springy, energy-sapping undergrowth). (If any of the previous visitors has tips for the best route, please let me know.)


 All pictures
#1: An exhausted confluence hunter, abandoning his trek, 1.28 miles from the point
#2: Lots of long grass (more than 2 meters tall)
#3: My GPS receiver, 1.28 miles from the point
#4: My GPS receiver, 1.28 miles from the point
ALL: All pictures on one page
  Notes
On the salt marshes of the Great Salt Lake's Farmington Bay. The terrain may be temporarily flooded.

On my map, the roads to the west of Kaysville are a little confusing. The basic landmark destination is the intersection of E 750 St S and Holmes Creek. The confluence is 1.78 miles (9384 feet) southwest (approximately) of this point. The actual heading is 227 degrees (true bearing).

Going south on SR 243/South Main St. in the center of Kaysville, bear right onto S 50 W (one block south of Center Street). Go 1.42 miles south until you come to Burton Lane (with I-15 directly to your right). Turn right onto S Burton Lane. Cross over or under I-15 and then a set of railroad tracks. Go 0.22 miles and cross another set of railroad tracks. Go 0.4 miles to the intersection with Sunset Drive. Turn left and go 0.3 miles; bear right onto an unnamed road! Go 1.14 miles on this road and intersect with E 750 St. S. Last road. Turn right and go 2.15 miles to Holmes Creek, your landmark destination as mentioned above.