W
NW
N
N
NE
W
the Degree Confluence Project
E
SW
S
S
SE
E

Australia : Queensland

9.2 km (5.7 miles) WNW of Macalister, QLD, Australia
Approx. altitude: 323 m (1059 ft)
([?] maps: Google MapQuest Multimap world confnav)
Antipode: 27°N 29°W

Accuracy: 5 m (16 ft)
Click on any of the images for the full-sized picture.

#2: The view east from the confluence #3: The view south from the confluence #4: The view west from the confluence #5: The GPS... The foreground was out of focus; this is the best I could do to sharpen it #6: The ground at the confluence point #7: Us city folk meet country roads. #8: The tyre track from the panel van - a close call. #9: The sign for the unsealed road, and the storm approaching the in the background.

  { Main | Search | Countries | Information | Member Page | Random }

  27°S 151°E (visit #2)  

#1: The view north from the confluence

(visited by Chris Gray and Robert King)

14-Dec-2003 --

This confluence is on an unsealed side road behind a farm, halfway between Warra & Macalister.

We began our drive to this confluence on the Gore Highway but turned north to head to Dalby, passing a sleepy little town called Cecil Plains on the way. After having an early lunch (very smart in hindsight) we moved on knowing that we werent far away from our first confluence for the day.

We'd read the previous visit to this confluence and knew there was a road to be taken near the confluence, and soon found a left hand turnoff from the Warrego Highway.

After two minutes or so the road turned right behind a farm. Not long after we came across some wet track. Figuring that there was no water pooled in the spot we decided to hit it hard and hope for the best. To our surprise we sank into the black soil considerably, but with our acceleration behind us we managed to push through it.

The road was dry again, but moments later there was another telltale black patch in the road. With confidence found the minute before we ploughed into this one, and not long after we were motionless and throwing mud with the tyres. For a few minutes we complicated things by trying to simply drive out of our increasingly worse bog, but to no avail. The next hour consisted of us piling up sticks and trying to get ourselves out of there. We ended up calling NRMA.

Since we had at the time neglected to find out what street we were on, it took a while for us to explain our position, and they were confused (to say the least) that we knew our latitude and longitude! We organised to have the local RACQ guy come out, and walked back on foot to the highway to wave him down.

About forty five minutes past before the RACQ guy arrived, in a panel van of all things. I hopped in the back as the front was a little crowded, and made do sitting an old tyre with leaky batteries as footrests.

Coming across the first bog that we'd made it through, the RACQ guy floored it through and narrowly missed hitting a gum tree because of the bog. After that close encounter he made it to our car.

After twenty minutes of figuring out the best way to do it, our car nearly pulled him into the bog. Defeated, he called in a tow-truck and left us to wait it out.

Because it was going to be a while away, Rob said he'd go off and try to get the confluence while I took the long walk back to the road to hail down this tow-truck.

I waited a half hour or so inside the car avoiding the sweltering heat before I would travel off to the highway again, and to my surprise Rob showed up near the car.

It turns out that the previous visit to the confluence wasn't accurate in that it said the track we were on continued on to end up closer to the confluence. It seemed to us, where we got bogged was almost the closest you could get to the confluence while still on the track.

We both walked back to the road, past an almost (but not) good enough to swim in dam, to wait for the tow-truck. Which would have been okay if it wasn't for the thunderstorm approaching!

But lucky for us it only rained, and there was some light tree cover (although lightning crossed my mind, it sure beat the rain).

In the end, the tow-truck arrived, towed us out of both bogs and sent us on our way.

(For more photos from this confluence and others in our trip, visit my photography site.)


 All pictures
#1: The view north from the confluence
#2: The view east from the confluence
#3: The view south from the confluence
#4: The view west from the confluence
#5: The GPS... The foreground was out of focus; this is the best I could do to sharpen it
#6: The ground at the confluence point
#7: Us city folk meet country roads.
#8: The tyre track from the panel van - a close call.
#9: The sign for the unsealed road, and the storm approaching the in the background.
ALL: All pictures on one page (broadband access recommended)