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the Degree Confluence Project
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Australia : Western Australia

4.6 km (2.9 miles) NW of West Holleton, WA, Australia
Approx. altitude: 374 m (1227 ft)
([?] maps: Google MapQuest Multimap world confnav)
Antipode: 32°N 61°W

Accuracy: 5 m (16 ft)
Click on any of the images for the full-sized picture.

#2: Looking north #3: Looking east #4: Looking south #5: At the confluence #6: GPS at the confluence #7: Leaving car for the long walk #8: Chris and Teddy at the confluence point #9: Lots of hay (a good year) #10: At gate 54 on the "Rabbit Proof Fence"

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  32°S 119°E (visit #5)  

#1: Looking west

(visited by Chris Bishop and Lisbet Lonvig)

10-Jan-2004 -- Amazing- no attempts for some time and then 3 in one week and 2 of those on the same day!

I read in a Xmas present book, called "The River" by P Newell, of a man visiting the authors farm and asking if he could access the confluence point. We had a look at the website mentioned, and became really interested. So, my wife Lisbet and I decided to follow the "fickled finger of fate" and try to do something similar.

We left Bunbury at ~ 0900 hours needing to travel several hundred kms at 69 degrees, as the "crow flies". The temperature was already climbing.

Went via Narrogin, Kulin and Narembeen before turning east down the gun barrel straight Mt Walker road. Zig-zagged onto Soldiers Rd, which was sealed until Church Road. A lone cloud, in an otherwise blue sky, seemed to mark the confluence in the distance.

Lots of sheep in recently harvested wheat paddocks, lots of parrots and healthy road side vegetation showing that it had been a good season. Took the Reid Road turnoff, learning from the mistakes of visit 2. Clay soils would mean that this road and the soil in general would be boggy in winter, requiring 4wd. At bend in Reid Road, northings indicated that it was time to head east. Opened (and closed) a good farmer's gate before driving ~ 500 m on a firebreak and parked just before a man made drainage gully. Then walked (with hats and plenty of water) to the corner of paddock which showed 32 00 24 8 and 118 59 47 4. Got through one barbed wire fence, crossed the corner of a harvested paddock before another fence and entered a large bare paddock.

After crossing to the far side of this gently sloping paddock, that showed signs of sheet soil erosion, and a lot of "3 steps right 2 steps forward" etc we got there!!

We cheered ourselves and the confluence with swigs of water, and took lots of photos. No sound, except for buzzing flies and the odd pink and grey galah cry. Large flock of merino sheep in the next paddock west of us.

Then horror of horrors, we found on this lunar landscape a cross of small pebbles about 6 metres south of "our" position. The signs of age and water erosion around it let me hope this was from attempt 2.

Camped that night at 54 mile gate, on the "rabbit proof fence" (or what's left of it). No nocturnal animal life, but many stars and satellites. Next day circumnavigated the low wide E-W valley, in which the confluence lies. Including the abandoned gold mining town of Holleton. Gold mining still occurs in the area. Also saw attempt 1's "give up" point with its recently harvested wheat.

Then back to Bunbury in near 40 degree heat and glad for our car air conditioning.


 All pictures
#1: Looking west
#2: Looking north
#3: Looking east
#4: Looking south
#5: At the confluence
#6: GPS at the confluence
#7: Leaving car for the long walk
#8: Chris and Teddy at the confluence point
#9: Lots of hay (a good year)
#10: At gate 54 on the "Rabbit Proof Fence"
ALL: All pictures on one page (broadband access recommended)