W
NW
N
N
NE
W
the Degree Confluence Project
E
SW
S
S
SE
E

Japan : Kyūshū

1.6 km (1.0 miles) W of Shukugen-jima (Island), Gotō-rettō (Archipelago), Nagasaki-ken, Kyūshū, Japan
Approx. altitude: 0 m (0 ft)
([?] maps: Google MapQuest Multimap world confnav)
Antipode: 33°S 51°W

Accuracy: 1.3 km (1399 yd)
Click on any of the images for the full-sized picture.

#2: 1.28 km from the confluence #3: N33 E129 is behind the island #4: Fukue & Nakadori islands #5: Fishing harbor near the confluence #6: Douzaki Church #7: Northern part of Fukue Island #8: Southern part of Nakadori Island #9: Wakamatsu beach #10: Northern part of Nakadori Island

  { Main | Search | Countries | Information | Member Page | Random }

  33°N 129°E (visit #1) (incomplete) 

#1: View towards Confluence from Nakadori Island

(visited by Fabrice Blocteur)

Japanese Narrative

14-Aug-2003 -- Following my visit to the confluence 33°N 130°E in Nagasaki, my next objective during my O-Bon holidays was now to find N33 E129 located in the Goto Islands. It was Wednesday morning and clouds had replaced the rain but the temperature was more autumnal than summery. I boarded the ferry at the Nagasaki terminal at 8 am and arrived at Fukue port just before noon. After check-in in a minshuku (Japanese style B & B) I went around the island trying to find the last vestiges of early Christianity in Japan.

After the edict issued in 1614 banning Christianity, about 150,000 believers went underground and continued to practice their religion in secret in segregated communities on sparsely populated southern islands such as the Goto Retto. When the ban was finally lifted in 1873, most of the underground Christians returned to the orthodox Roman Catholic Church under the guidance of French missionaries and new churches were built. More than fifty can be found today throughout the Goto Islands. One particularly interesting church is the one found in Douzaki on the northern part of Fukue Island. It contains a small museum with some artifacts that remained hidden for almost three centuries. Some represent the Virgin Mary looking more like a Bodhisattva than a Catholic statue. Shortly after visiting the Church, the rain started to fall again. I cut across the island and went to a “rotenburo” (open-air bath) to warm up before going back to Fukue city to spend the night.

The rain had stopped when I took the ferry the next morning to get to the confluence located west of Nakadori Island. The ferry passed 1.28 km from the N33 E129 position before reaching Wakamatsu shortly before noon. I spent the next two hours trying to find a boat in the surrounding villages. Near one of those villages, I came across some Heike’s tombs. Here, according to a legend, 10 members of the fugitive Heike clan committed suicide when they discovered they couldn’t hide from the pursuit of the Genji warriors after the battle of Dannoura in 1185. Four centuries later, persecuted Christians would follow the same route with roughly the same consequences.

Although the sun had finally appeared, a very strong wind had picked up and the waves were now three meters high. None of the fishermen I asked wanted to go to sea. Most of all because today was August 14th and tomorrow people would spend the day celebrating O-Bon. I gave up and spent the rest of the day visiting the southern part of the island where some communities are still almost 100% Christians. Cemeteries can be seen here and there containing both Buddhist and Christian tombs. Statues of the Virgin Mary, Joseph or Jesus stand in front or near public buildings. And churches are found in almost every village. It felt more like being somewhere in the Philippines than in Japan.

The next morning I got up very early and went back to the same villages hopping to have better luck. The sun had been up for almost an hour but the wind was stronger and the waves higher than yesterday. I was hopping that perhaps some Christians would defy the Buddhist Festival of the dead and go to sea but most of the villages were deserted. The only few people I met all gave me the same answer: “Today is O-Bon and the sea is too rough”. After two hours I again gave up and this time visited the northern part of the island.

Although the majority of Japanese Christians returned to the Catholic Church, there were many who opted to maintain the style of faith cultivated during the centuries of hiding and to refuse orthodox Christianity. These people are known as the “Kakure Kirishitan” (Hidden Christians), and although their numbers keep decreasing, they continue to practice their faith. However, as Miyazaki Kentaro, a Japanese scholar, stresses: “The essence and outward forms of this faith have diverged widely from those introduced to Japan by Francisco Xavier and the other European missionaries of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. It would be more accurate to call it a folk religion altogether Japanese in spirit and content.” Centuries of concealment and isolation had changed their faith into something unique with secrecy an integral part of its doctrine.

Christal Whelan, a Sophia University researcher who studied the Kakure Kirishitan in the Goto Islands, found that their prayers are almost phonetically perfect. She also realized that not one of the faithful, not even the congregational leaders, knew what they meant. “Most of their prayers are in Japanese, but there are Portuguese and Latin words, which no one understands,” she said. For example, they didn't know that the Portuguese word “Belem” meant Bethlehem, the birthplace of Jesus. The believers recite “orasho” – from the Latin “oratio” meaning prayer – but do not understand the Japanese-Latin language combinations. That is not so different from Catholics whose liturgical use of Latin was discontinued only a generation ago. “Most people reciting Buddhist sutras don't understand them either,” said Whelan.

Japanese Narrative

14-Aug-2003 -- 北緯33度、東経130度の交差点を長崎に訪ねた後、私は盆休みの間に五島列島にある北緯33度、東経129度のポイントを訪れることにした。水曜の朝、雨は止んだものの、夏というよりは秋を思わせる天気だった。8時のフェリーで長崎港を発ち、昼前に福江港に着いた。民宿に宿をとり、島に残るキリスト信仰の跡を探しに出かけることにした。

1614年、キリスト教禁令が出されて後、15万人もの信者が五島列島のような人口まばらな南の島々に小さな集団をつくり、ひそかに信仰を守り続けたのだった。やがて1873年、その禁が解かれると、隠れキリシタンの多くは晴れてローマ正教の帰依者となり、フランスからは宣教師が訪れ、新しい教会も建てられた。50以上もの教会が五島列島に現存する。堂崎にある教会は特に興味深かった。併設されている小さな資料館は300年の間隠し通された信仰の品々を今に伝えている。マリア像はキリスト教の像というより、どことなく菩薩を思わせる顔立ちだ。教会を訪れてほどなく、また雨が降り出した。私は福江市に戻る前に身体を温めるべく、島の反対側にある露天風呂へ行くことにした。

雨も上がった翌朝、中通島の西にあるコンフルエンスを目指しフェリーに乗った。船は、北緯33度、東経129度のポイントから1.28㎞の地点を通り、昼少し前に若松に着いた。ボートはないものかと、あたりの村を2時間ほど歩いていると、平家の墓を見つけた。伝説によれば、10人の平家の落人が1185年、壇ノ浦の戦いに敗れ、源氏の追手を逃れる術はないことを悟り、自害したということである。4世紀のち、迫害されたキリスト教者達がその後に続くことになる。

ようやく太陽が顔を出したが、強風が波をあおり、今や3mの高さである。漁師に舟を出してくれるよう頼むが誰もウンと言わない。今日は14日、明日は盆の15日なのだから無理もない。私は海に出ることをあきらめ、住民のほとんど全員がキリスト教徒という島の南部を訪れることにした。墓地には仏教とキリスト教が混在している。公共の建物の前、あるいは横に聖母マリア、ヨセフ、キリストの像が立っている。どの村にも教会があり、日本というよりフィリピンのどこかにいるような気がする。

次の朝早く、私は幸運を祈って前日の村に再び行ってみた。太陽は1時間も前に登っていたが、風が強く波は昨日より高かった。キリスト教徒なら盆の行事などかまわず、海に出てくれるだろうと思ったが、ほとんどの村は無人だった。わずかに会った人々は皆、一様に「今日はお盆だし、波が高すぎる」と言うのだった。私は再びあきらめ、今度は島の北部へ行くことにした。

日本のキリスト教信者の大多数はカソリツクだが、永い迫害の歴史の中で変容し、従来のキリスト教とは異なる教えを信奉する人々も多数存在した。これらの人々は「隠れキリシタン」と呼ばれ、その数は減り続けているものの、今なおその教えを守っている。宮崎健太郎氏は、次のように言う「これら(隠れキリシタン)の信仰は16.7世紀にフランシスコ・ザビエルやその他、ヨーロッパの宣教師によってもたらされた教えから遠く離れたように見える。より正確には、その精神性と内容において、日本の民間信仰を集めたもの、と呼ぶ方がいいだろう。」幾世紀に亘り封じ込められ、孤立させられた信仰は他の教義をも取り込み、独自のものへと変容したのである。

五島における隠れキリシタンについて研究したソフィア大学のクリスタル・ウェラン氏によると、彼らの祈りの言葉は音の上では完璧に近いそうである。氏はまた、信仰厚い人々の誰一人として、そのリーダーさえも、祈りの言葉が何を意味するか理解してはいなかった、とも述べている。「祈り言葉のほとんどは日本語ですが、ポルトガル語やラテン語も含まれており、誰もわからないでしょう」例えば、彼らはポルトガル語の”Belem”がベツレヘム(キリスト生誕の地)であることを知らなかったし、”オラショー”という言葉を唱えながら、それが祈りを表すラテン語のoratioから来ていることを知らなかった。カソリックにおいても、つい一世代前にようやくミサの中でラテン語を使うのを止めたばかりなのである。「ほとんどの人は、お経の意味を知らずに唱えている。それと同じことです」とウェラン氏は言う。

外から見るかぎり、まさに言葉の壁がキリスト教の教義を理解させることをはばんだが、同時に、信者を結びつけ、彼らの信仰を生き延びさせることになったのは皮肉なことではある。

Translated by Yuko Hashimoto


 All pictures
#1: View towards Confluence from Nakadori Island
#2: 1.28 km from the confluence
#3: N33 E129 is behind the island
#4: Fukue & Nakadori islands
#5: Fishing harbor near the confluence
#6: Douzaki Church
#7: Northern part of Fukue Island
#8: Southern part of Nakadori Island
#9: Wakamatsu beach
#10: Northern part of Nakadori Island
ALL: All pictures on one page (broadband access recommended)
  Notes
In the water, about 500 m from land.