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the Degree Confluence Project
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United States : Wyoming

6.8 miles (11.0 km) SSW of Hazelton, Johnson, WY, USA
Approx. altitude: 2439 m (8001 ft)
([?] maps: Google MapQuest Multimap topo aerial world confnav)
Antipode: 44°S 73°E

Accuracy: 4.9 km (3.0 mi)
Click on any of the images for the full-sized picture.

#2: tight fences and locked gates #3: the face of the dam at Dullknife Reservoir #4: Dullknife Reservoir #5: GPS screen #6: another GPS screen

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  44°N 107°W (visit #2) (incomplete) 

#1: looking south - the confluence is somewhere along the ridge top to the right of the pine trees; the stream is the North Fork of the Powder River just below its outlet from the Dullknife Reservoir

(visited by David Mower and Diane Mower)

09-Jul-2003 -- I’ve wanted to visit this confluence for a long time, especially after reading Danny Strickland’s report about it. We approached from the west on Highway 16 passing through the town of Ten Sleep and then on to the junction with Wyoming Highway 436.

We took 436 which surprisingly passed by a golf course. I thought that there wasn’t much population around to support a golf course. The town of Ten Sleep had a population of less than 500 according to its highway sign. Anyway, we continued on 436 until the pavement ended and the road designation changed to CR56. According to the County Planner in Worland the road is also called the Rome Hill Road.

This road leads up into beautiful high mountain valleys. Sheep and cattle were grazing. We passed the county boundary line, leaving Washakie County and entering Johnson County. We soon came to Hazelton Road. I had plotted some other waypoints the day before so we began looking for them. They lead us to roads but each had a locked gate and a No Trespassing sign. We spent an hour driving around, but everything was fenced, gated and posted. Our closest approach was 4.88 km.

I had assumed from the prior report and from the maps I had seen that this was high mountain country. In the western United States that usually means public land administered by the US Forest Service. My assumption was wrong.

Still it was a great day with stunning vistas and a chance to contemplate the beauty of the earth.

Thanks for getting us out!


 All pictures
#1: looking south - the confluence is somewhere along the ridge top to the right of the pine trees; the stream is the North Fork of the Powder River just below its outlet from the Dullknife Reservoir
#2: tight fences and locked gates
#3: the face of the dam at Dullknife Reservoir
#4: Dullknife Reservoir
#5: GPS screen
#6: another GPS screen
ALL: All pictures on one page (broadband access recommended)