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the Degree Confluence Project
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Canada : Nova Scotia

2.2 km (1.4 miles) NW of Catalone, Cape Breton Island, NS, Canada
Approx. altitude: 23 m (75 ft)
([?] maps: Google MapQuest Multimap topo topo250 world confnav)
Antipode: 46°S 120°E

Click on any of the images for the full-sized picture.

#2: The view south from the confluence into some other trees. #3: The GPS reading from the confluence. #4: Mark and Elda standing at the confluence. #5: Elda beside the car, getting prepared for the short 120 metre hike to the confluence. #6: A low-lying cloud on the surface of St. Ann’s Bay. #7: Elda at the Louisbourg National Historic Site.

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  46°N 60°W (visit #1)  

#1: The view north from the confluence into some trees.

(visited by Mark and Elda Prudden)

03-Sep-2001 -- N46W60 was our 7th successfully reached confluence, 1 of 2 that we did on the long Labour Day weekend (see also N46W61).

We reached it the morning of Monday, September 3,2001 (i.e. Labour Day) after already having spent an eventful weekend discovering the other confluence and hiking in Cape Breton Highlands National Park.

Mark and I had decided to finish off our weekend by visiting the Louisbourg National Historic Site which is located on the southeastern coast of Cape Breton Island. Conveniently, the confluence is located just off of the Louisbourg Highway (i.e. Highway 22) en route to Louisbourg.

After a morning driving past many beautiful Cape Breton scenes (see photo 6), we reached 46 degrees north latitude and parked the car on the side of the Louisbourg Highway. The confluence lay only about 120 metres west of the road.

Making our way to the confluence, we weren’t quite sure whether or not we were trespassing on someone’s land. There was a house a short distance to the south, but the confluence lies in what appears to be an unused forested area that may have been logged some time ago.

It was a beautiful, sunny, warm day. The surrounding vegetation consisted of various pine trees, spruce trees, larch trees, wild blueberries and wild blackberries. The ground seemed spongy, reminiscent of arctic muskeg. While Mark attended to the confluence details, I became engrossed in gathering up as many of the wild berries as I could. I stopped only to pose for pictures and to feed Mark some of the collected berries.

In summary, this confluence was one of the easiest ones we’ve reached. Nevertheless, for me, it will remain one of the more memorable ones thanks to the abundance of free (and free-range!) produce.

The photos submitted are as follows: Photo 1 shows the view north from the confluence into some trees. Photo 2 shows the view south from the confluence into some more trees. (The views to the east and west are remarkably similar!) Photo 3 shows the GPS reading from the confluence. Photo 4 shows the two of us standing at the confluence (the camera is facing north if that is of any significance). Photo 5 shows me (Elda) beside the car, getting prepared for the short 120 metre hike to the confluence. Photo 6 shows one of the many beautiful scenes encountered on our drive to the confluence. This particular scene is of a low-lying cloud on the surface of St. Ann’s Bay. Photo 7 shows me (Elda) at the Louisbourg National Historic Site. This site of 17th century battles between the French and English is only 5 miles (8 km) south of the confluence.


 All pictures
#1: The view north from the confluence into some trees.
#2: The view south from the confluence into some other trees.
#3: The GPS reading from the confluence.
#4: Mark and Elda standing at the confluence.
#5: Elda beside the car, getting prepared for the short 120 metre hike to the confluence.
#6: A low-lying cloud on the surface of St. Ann’s Bay.
#7: Elda at the Louisbourg National Historic Site.
ALL: All pictures on one page (broadband access recommended)