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the Degree Confluence Project
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Canada : Alberta

8.8 km (5.5 miles) SW of Waterton Park, AB, Canada
Approx. altitude: 1581 m (5186 ft)
([?] maps: Google MapQuest Multimap topo topo250 world confnav)
Antipode: 49°S 66°E

Accuracy: 143 m (469 ft)
Click on any of the images for the full-sized picture.

#2: Looking east along the border cutline #3: Looking west along the border cutline #4: Looking south into Montana #5: Glacier fed lake seen from trail #6: Marker post on boundary cutline

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  49°N 114°W (visit #1) (incomplete) 

#1: Looking north in Alberta

(visited by Gordon Haverland, P.Eng.)

06-Aug-2001 -- Waterton-Glacier International Peace Park: the world's first International Peace Park. The 114W confluence deep in the heart of Waterton-Glacier is the last confluence on the Canada/US border within Alberta. As the crow flies, it is about a 9 km hike from the Cameron Lake campsite. However, the terrain is far too rugged to let you take anything approximating a straight line approach! You traverse 4 switchbacks on the trail up to Summit Lake, and 4 switchbacks on the trail down to the border trail. The hike between Cameron Lake and Summit Lake is quite nice (just a little steep), with culverts and bridges keeping the trail dry. On the south side of Summit Lake, things are considerably different. Little travel is done on this trail, and the trail is nearly overgrown with vegetation in many places. The trail crosses the international boundary cutline at 48 59' 55.7" N and 114 0' 35.1" W. This is approximately 0.71 km from the "confluence".

The closest approach to 114 W on the boundary trail requires one to walk through about 0.36 km of fairly heavy forest. The point I chose to take confluence pictures at was 48 59' 55.4" N and 114 0' 0" W, with a UTM of 719412 Easting, 5431664m Northing and 1534 m elevation.

On the way back to Cameron Lake, I met a US Park Ranger repairing a Bear warning sign at the point where the boundary crosses the cutline noted previously. He mentioned that for some reason, the bears like to wreck this warning sign during the spring. There is lots of berries along the trail, which means keeping aware for bears is a necessity. I didn't see any bears on the trip, but on the way back I was chased by a horse fly for about 4 km (or maybe a pack of them :-).


 All pictures
#1: Looking north in Alberta
#2: Looking east along the border cutline
#3: Looking west along the border cutline
#4: Looking south into Montana
#5: Glacier fed lake seen from trail
#6: Marker post on boundary cutline
ALL: All pictures on one page (broadband access recommended)
  Notes
In the Waterton Lakes National Park. The borderline with the U.S. is running about 150 m south of the Confluence.