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the Degree Confluence Project
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United States : Arizona

26.3 miles (42.3 km) ENE of Page, Coconino, AZ, USA
Approx. altitude: 1436 m (4711 ft)
([?] maps: Google MapQuest Multimap topo aerial world confnav)
Antipode: 37°S 69°E

Accuracy: 2.3 km (1.4 mi)
Click on any of the images for the full-sized picture.

#2: I soon came to this gate with padding to aid in crossing it #3: looking northwest towards the confluence #4: looking east toward the west face of Navajo Mountain #5: astounding rocks #6: GPS screen at closest approach

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  37°N 111°W (visit #1) (incomplete) 

#1: I started hiking here, heading Northwest toward the confluence

(visited by David Mower)

18-Jul-2001 -- One of the last unvisited confluences in Arizona. I so wanted it not to be an attempt, but time, the arch enemy of all explorers, doomed the effort.

The DCP index lists this confluence as being 26-plus miles ENE of Page, Arizona. But that’s 26 miles as the crow flies. Its probably four times that distance by car. Its near the west end of Navajo Mountain and in the slick-rock canyons that lead into Lake Powell.

I was able to drive to N 36° 59.242' W 110° 55.610, at which point the elevation was about 1,720 meters. I left the car and proceeded on foot to N 36° 59.769' W 110° 57.036'. I had walked about 3 kilometers and the elevation was then about 1,520 meters. My self-imposed turn-back deadline was approaching and I was on a ridge top with no easy hiking alternatives available. So, I turned back. I suspect that a successful visit would be an all-day affair and should probably be a team effort.

This is beautiful desert country. I saw lizards and birds, especially blue jays (which local people call “camp robbers.”) The rock formations were quite astounding. The flora consisted of pinion pine, juniper, sagebrush, yucca, prickly-pear cactus and some scattered grass. There were also some scrub oak and cottonwood in the protected alcoves and dry stream-beds where water collects.

This was my closest-ever encounter with Navajo Mountain. It appears to be a giant block of uplifted sandstone. It is part of the Navajo Indian Reservation. The Navajo Nation is building a wonderful hard-surfaced road, IR16, which I drove on for part of the journey.

A bad day exploring is still better than any other day. I hope to return.


 All pictures
#1: I started hiking here, heading Northwest toward the confluence
#2: I soon came to this gate with padding to aid in crossing it
#3: looking northwest towards the confluence
#4: looking east toward the west face of Navajo Mountain
#5: astounding rocks
#6: GPS screen at closest approach
ALL: All pictures on one page (broadband access recommended)