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the Degree Confluence Project
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United States : California

32.8 miles (52.8 km) SW of Death Valley, Inyo, CA, USA
Approx. altitude: 1234 m (4048 ft)
([?] maps: Google MapQuest Multimap topo aerial world confnav)
Antipode: 36°S 63°E

Click on any of the images for the full-sized picture.

#2: Another view from the confluence point #3: Another view from the confluence point #4: A strange-looking cave (or perhaps an old mine shaft?) visible near the confluence point #5: My GPS receiver's display at the confluence point

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  36°N 117°W (visit #1)  

#1: A view from the confluence point

(visited by Ross Finlayson)

31-Dec-1999 -- This remote confluence is located in California's rugged Panamint Mountains, within Death Valley National Park. However, people with high-clearance 4WD vehicles will be able to reach this confluence without exerting any (human) energy: "Warm Spring Canyon Road" climbs up from the valley to pass about 1 mile south of the confluence, but just as the road crosses the longitude 117 degree mark, another narrow gravel road branches off to the right. This road passes within 1/4 mile of the confluence, which can then be reached with an easy hike.

Not having a 4WD vehicle, however, I had to do this the hard way: on my mountain bike. I parked my car about 6 miles up Warm Spring Canyon Road (as the road started getting too rough to risk w/o a 4WD), and rode my bike the rest of the way. This was a ride of about 10 miles each way along rough gravel, with a 3000+ foot elevation gain.

Several abandoned mines can be seen along Warm Spring Road (see, for example, photo 6). True to the road's name, there's also a 'warm spring' at [35.96812,-116.93144], but the buildings here have fallen into disuse, and the pool was empty when I passed :-(

This confluence is starkly beautiful in its isolation. It's clear that very few of California's 30+ million residents ever pass this way. It's always nice to be reminded there are some parts of California that won't be turning into subdivisions and strip malls any time soon.

I visited this confluence on December 31st, 1999. Later that evening, I celebrated the New Year at Death Valley's Furnace Creek campground, secure in the knowledge that I'd earned it.


 All pictures
#1: A view from the confluence point
#2: Another view from the confluence point
#3: Another view from the confluence point
#4: A strange-looking cave (or perhaps an old mine shaft?) visible near the confluence point
#5: My GPS receiver's display at the confluence point
#6: An abandoned mine on Warm Springs Road, leading to the confluence
ALL: All pictures on one page (broadband access recommended)
  Notes
In the Death Valley National Park.