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the Degree Confluence Project
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United States : Utah

4.0 miles (6.5 km) SW of Kaysville, Davis, UT, USA
Approx. altitude: 1282 m (4205 ft)
([?] maps: Google MapQuest Multimap topo aerial world confnav)
Antipode: 41°S 68°E

Accuracy: 5 m (16 ft)
Click on any of the images for the full-sized picture.

#2: Early morning start #3: Frozen path through the reeds #4: The march to the confluence #5: All zeros #6: The thinning ice #7: The aftermath #8: A geocache located a few feet away, at N 40 59.992 W 112 00.023 #9: Footprints through the salt mud

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  41°N 112°W (visit #10)  

#1: The view back

(visited by Craig Riddle)

11-Feb-2012 -- This confluence is about two miles west of the nearest road west of Kaysville, Utah. We had been planning this trip since fall, intending to go while the marshes would be frozen. This has been an incredibly warm winter, causing us to miss the opportunity for as thick of ice as we had hoped. As the time approaches for a date we set about a week in advance, the weather just kept getting warmer. The high the day before the trip was in the mid 50's and the overnight low a little above freezing.

The start of the trip involved tromping through cow field mud that would grab your boots and try to pull them off. My buddy fell in this mud in the first few hundred yards. Not too worry, he washed it off when we crossed a creek a few hundred yards later and he fell in the water. After the creek crossing and another cow field, we entered into the phragmites (reeds). We were fortunate enough to have been given some coordinates, from somebody else who had also made the journey, for a path through the reeds.

There was a trail left by ATV's or Airboat's that took us right through the reeds to the open marches to the west. This path was frozen over. For most of the way out we were careful not to fall through. Eventually, we realized that it wasn't really necessary to worry. When we broke through the ice, the water was quite shallow and didn't go over the tops of our boots.

Once we got through the reeds, the trip was simply a bee-line walk for about a mile through a few inches of water, covering a sticky mud, straight the the confluence point.


 All pictures
#1: The view back
#2: Early morning start
#3: Frozen path through the reeds
#4: The march to the confluence
#5: All zeros
#6: The thinning ice
#7: The aftermath
#8: A geocache located a few feet away, at N 40 59.992 W 112 00.023
#9: Footprints through the salt mud
ALL: All pictures on one page (broadband access recommended)
  Notes
On my map, the roads to the west of Kaysville are a little confusing. The basic landmark destination is the intersection of E 750 St S and Holmes Creek. The confluence is 1.78 miles (9384 feet) southwest (approximately) of this point. The actual heading is 227 degrees (true bearing).
Going south on SR 243/South Main St. in the center of Kaysville, bear right onto S 50 W (one block south of Center Street). Go 1.42 miles south until you come to Burton Lane (with I-15 directly to your right). Turn right onto S Burton Lane. Cross over or under I-15 and then a set of railroad tracks. Go 0.22 miles and cross another set of railroad tracks. Go 0.4 miles to the intersection with Sunset Drive. Turn left and go 0.3 miles; bear right onto an unnamed road! Go 1.14 miles on this road and intersect with E 750 St. S. Last road. Turn right and go 2.15 miles to Holmes Creek, your landmark destination as mentioned above.