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the Degree Confluence Project
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Australia : South Australia

37.2 km (23.1 miles) NE of Belton, SA, Australia
Approx. altitude: 312 m (1023 ft)
([?] maps: Google MapQuest Multimap world confnav)
Antipode: 32°N 41°W

Accuracy: 4 m (13 ft)
Click on any of the images for the full-sized picture.

#2: Looking South from the Confluence #3: Looking East from the Confluence #4: Looking West from the Confluence #5: Diapur Bore less than 2 kilometres from the Confluence on the station track #6: GSP Reading

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  32°S 139°E (visit #2)  

#1: Looking North from the Confluence

(visited by Stephen Langman and Fiona Langman)

10-Jun-2007 -- After successfully completing our first confluence of the day, we headed further north from Peterborough to Orroroo, on the last of the bitumen roads until our last confluence visit of the day and reaching Port Augusta at 7pm. Leaving Orroroo, we headed out on the Carrieton Road, then turned to our right on the Johnburgh Road. The good rains that we had in the lower parts of South Australia were not evident the further north that we travelled, again showing the importance and reliability of the Goyder’s Line of rainfall.

Goyder’s Line of rainfall is an imaginary line marking off a very large area of rural South Australia that receives 254mm of rainfall a year or less. This line was named after the then Surveyor General, George Goyder, who in 1865 travelled nearly 5000 kilometres on horseback to distinguish a division between arable (guaranteed rainfall) and arid land. North of the Goyder’s Line was deemed Pastoral land and should not be cropped and was also the start of Saltbush and Bluebush country.

The country slowly changed the further north that we travelled, from the vast open plains to the more rugged country that dominates the Flinders Rangers. We had no problems finding our way towards the confluence, as the entire road junctions were clearly marked, as long as we followed the signs and kept heading for Baratta.

Right on cue, it was time to leave the good quality dirt road and make the 5 kilometre detour journey to the confluence on a reasonable station track. About 2 kilometres from the confluence, we passed Diapur Bore. Outback bores play a very important part in the rural Australia livestock scene. Without any permanent surface water supplies, these silent sentinels draw water from great depths below the earth’s surface to sustain life for millions of cattle and sheep right across Australia. The closer that we got to the confluence, the more prolific were the dozens of kangaroo that made quick departures from our approaching vehicle.

As the final distance began to count down quickly, we were able to drive to within less than 20 metres of the confluence on the station track. Even though it was a perfect weather wise days, the friendly flies made their presence known. Because of the vast open area that we were in, the usual confluence dance was very minimal, so it was then down to taking the required photos. The land around the Confluence was Bluebush and a few small trees. After we left this typical Australian outback scene we stopped for our lunch break and then further west for our next waiting confluence of S32 E138.


 All pictures
#1: Looking North from the Confluence
#2: Looking South from the Confluence
#3: Looking East from the Confluence
#4: Looking West from the Confluence
#5: Diapur Bore less than 2 kilometres from the Confluence on the station track
#6: GSP Reading
ALL: All pictures on one page (broadband access recommended)