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the Degree Confluence Project
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New Zealand : South Island

4.5 km (2.8 miles) NE of Gibbston, Otago, S. Island, New Zealand
Approx. altitude: 1003 m (3290 ft)
([?] maps: Google MapQuest Multimap world confnav)
Antipode: 45°N 11°W

Accuracy: 3 m (9 ft)
Click on any of the images for the full-sized picture.

#2: View West #3: View North #4: View East #5: The confluence point lies in a flat patch of tussock grass #6: All zeros! #7: A telephoto view down to Highway 6 and the small farming settlement of Gibbston #8: Where I started my hike - from a lookout point on the Crown Range Road, several km west of the point #9: This spiky native plant (called “Spaniard” or “Speargrass”) was growing in several places along the route #10: A large quartzite rock alongside the trail (3.38km from the point)

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  45°S 169°E (visit #3)  

#1: View South

(visited by Ross Finlayson)

01-Mar-2016 -- The two previous visitors to this point - more than 10 years ago - started from Highway 6 at 45.02474S 169.04436E, at elevation ~260 m. This required a climb of at least 745 m to reach the point (which is at ~1005 m).

I, however, wanted to avoid such a long continuous climb by starting higher up, from a lookout point on the Crown Range Road at 44.99245S 168.93871E, at elevation ~1070 m. Although this starting point is several km west of the degree confluence point, satellite imagery showed that there is a trail - starting here - that runs to 169 degrees East, at which point another trail descends to near the degree confluence point. I thought that by hiking these trails, I could save some climbing, at the expense of a longer hike.

It turns out that I probably did save some climbing - although not as much as I’d originally hoped, because the trail - through the Pisa Conservation Area - climbs considerably above the elevation of the starting point (and the degree confluence point), with two high points of 1433 m and 1487 m. Also, the total distance hiking (to and from the point) was considerable: 20.6 km - the longest that I’ve ever hiked to visit a degree confluence point! In conclusion, the route that I took would be best done with a mountain bike; on foot, the straight up-and-down hike from Highway 6 would be better.

Shortly after reaching the trail’s high point (1487 m), I encountered two junctions - each with a gate - at 44.97940S 168.99652E and 44.98177S 168.99957E. In each case I took the right-hand path, continuing down towards the point. On the way, I crossed two more fences as I continued down the path, which eventually passes 310 m east of the degree confluence point.

At this point, I continued on foot through dense tussock grass, to reach the point, which lies in a flat area with somewhat shorter grass. Unlike the two previous visits - which had been in winter - there was no snow anywhere to be seen. From the point, there is a view down towards Highway 6 and the small farming settlement of Gibbston.


 All pictures
#1: View South
#2: View West
#3: View North
#4: View East
#5: The confluence point lies in a flat patch of tussock grass
#6: All zeros!
#7: A telephoto view down to Highway 6 and the small farming settlement of Gibbston
#8: Where I started my hike - from a lookout point on the Crown Range Road, several km west of the point
#9: This spiky native plant (called “Spaniard” or “Speargrass”) was growing in several places along the route
#10: A large quartzite rock alongside the trail (3.38km from the point)
ALL: All pictures on one page (broadband access recommended)